Davo Karničar is a 52 year-old Alpinist and Alpine skier, Alpinist instructor and mountain rescuer, ski instructor and trainer (he is also head of the first ski school for Nepalese children). As a competitive alpine skier, he was champion of Slovenia, second in the Balkans and competitor in the world cup. He is the author of the book "Alpinizem, samoljubje, ljubezen" ("Alpinism, vanity and love") and co-author of the book "Z Everesta" ("From Everest"). He runs a mountaineering and ski school at Jezersko and, together with his wife, Petra, is currently establishing a mountaineering centre at Ravenska Kočna.

Since 1980 he has achieved over 1,700 alpine climbs and descents. Together with his brother, he is the first Slovenian to have skied from an eight-thousander, and, first and foremost, the first person on Earth to have skied continuously from the highest peak in the world (Mount Everest) and the first man to have skied down the highest peaks of each of the seven continents. He is recipient of the Bloudek award and silver Order of Freedom of the Republic of Slovenia for extraordinary achievements. The Men's Journal magazine has named him best extreme sportsperson of the year, and he was nominated for the most prestigious sporting achievements award (laureus) in the special or extreme achievements category. 

As a climber, his single most exceptional achievement was his solo climb of the Bonatti Pillar of the Aiguille du Dru. After this achievement, he decided to focus on alpine skiing. In Slovenia, he has skied down the summits of Triglav, Jalovec, Dolgi hrbet, Špik, Grintovec, Kočna. However, his main achievements include descents down faces, glaciers and even icefalls (for example, he has frequently skied down Sinji Slap near Češka koča). He was the first to ski down (and repeat) the Fritsch-Lindenbach route in the north face of Grintovec or Dolška škrbina, which is classified as a grade 7 (the most difficult) route and is the most difficult route anyone has skied down in Slovenia. In Europe, his descents down the north-east face of Eiger and the east face of Matterhorn are two of his most prominent achievements. However, in global terms, he is mostly known for his skiing descents from Annapurna and Mount Everest, both eight-thousanders.

After skiing down the world's (and Asia's) highest peak, he had descended the remaining highest peaks of the seven continents by 2006: Kilimanjaro, Elbrus, Aconcagua, Mount Kosciuszko, Denali and Mount Wilson, and thus became the first man to do so. In the coming years he had the ligaments in his right knee reconstructed and, during the Manaslu expedition in 2009, lost his climbing partner Franc Oderlap when the col he was on collapsed. He postponed expeditions to eigh- thousanders until 2015, when he decided to ski down Gasherbrum I as part of the Ski K2 2016 project.

Year Descent
1982 Mont Blanc (4,807 metres) - through Bossons: IV, 500 metres, II+, 1,500 metres
1984 Sinji slap: VII–, 250 metres
1986 Elbrus (5,642 metres) - from the summit to the saddle and then to the south: III, S4 in places, 2,150 metres
1987 Dolgi hrbet (2,457 metres) – north-west face: the "Ski" route (from the rock ridge below the face edge): VI–, S6 in places, 1,100 metres
1989 Grintovec (2,558 metres)/Dolška škrbina – north face: Fritsch-Lindenbach route: VII, S5 to S7, 700 metres
1989 Mlinarsko sedlo (2,334 metres) - north face (via the route): VI–, S6 in places, 450 metres
1991 Kočna (2,540 metres) – the Kremžar route: V+, S6 in places, 700 metres
1991 Koroška Rinka (2,433 metres) – north face (via the route): VI, 350 metres
1991 Grintovec (2,558 metres)/Dolška škrbina – north face: Fritsch-Lindenbach route: VII, S5 to S7, 700 metres
1992 Ledinski vrh (2,108 metres) – north-east face: the Skovir route: V+, S6 in places, 800 metres
1992 Kočna (2,540 metres) – the Pirhar route: VI, S6+, 700 metres
1994 Eiger (3,970 metres) – north-east face – the Lauper route from the Mittellegi ridge (3,650 metres): VI+ 1,300 metres
1994 Matterhorn (4,478 metres) – east face beginning at the horn (4,200 metres): VI, up to S6+ in places, 1,200 metres
1994 Mont Blanc du Tacul (4,248 metres) – north glacier: VI–, 450 metres
1995 Annapurna (8,091 metres) – north face: VI, parts S7, 3,700 metres (the first ski down from an eight-thousander by a Slovenian)
2000 Mt. Everest (8,848 metres) – over the Hillary Step, through the south saddle into the west crevasse and along the Khumbu icefall under the Lho La col to the base camp: in the upper parts, S6, S5 in places, 3,500 metres (the first continuous ski descent from the top of the world)
2003 Aconcagua (6,969 metres) – from the summit ranging from "normal" to T1, then via the glacier to base camp altitude
2004 Denali (6,193 metres) – combination of the West Buttress and Ice slope routes: up to 50°, 4,200 metres
2006 Grintovec (2558 metres)/Dolška škrbina – north face: Fritsch-Lindenbach route: VII, S5 to S7, 700 metres
2006 Mount Vinson (4,897 metres) – normal 45° route, 2,000 metres (Antarctic's highest peak, conclusion of the 7summits project)
2007 Elbrus (5,642 metres) from the summit to the saddle and then to the south: III, S4 in places, 2,150 metres
2010 Elbrus (5,642 metres) from the summit to the saddle and then to the south: III, S4 in places, 2,150 metres
2013 Damavad (5,671 metres) - eastwards descent: 2,600 metres
2014 Elbrus (5,642 metres) from the summit to the saddle and then to the south: III, S4 in places, 2,150 metres
2014 Tuqllarahu (6,035 metres) north-west face/ridge: between 60° and 70° in places, 1,000 metres